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Dacian War by Fall3NAiRBoRnE Dacian War by Fall3NAiRBoRnE
Dacian War
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:iconpaullian:
Paullian Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Professional Interface Designer
Great pic! Wonderful work, very atmospheric and emotionally intense! Thanks for sharing!Woohooooo! 
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:iconalanusrex:
AlanusRex Featured By Owner May 5, 2015  Professional General Artist
Roman "civilization". :)
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner May 5, 2015
Can't tell if this is a sarcastic remark with the quotes and what not. In either case, thanks for the comment.
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:iconalanusrex:
AlanusRex Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Professional General Artist
I'm a so-said result between romans and dacians, and I can but admire roman civilization.
They teared everything to the ground to build their own , following their rules: a total war, a complete destruction of the vanquished, as Stalin will to confess Tito centuries later, perfectly applying the darwinist and eugenic pillars of communism over the territories conquered by the red army. And yet, in my country, we still have this beautiful legend that Trajan came and let his romans have intercourse with dacians women, in order to give birth to a great people - today's romanians. But here is depicted (and you're not the only one) the side behind the legend.
It's time to put in question the roman advancements. The gauls, germans and britons (and actually dacians, parthians, egyptians, so on), for instance, were no absent civilization. In fact, it was more solid than the roman one, because they did not need the pillaging campaign to be launched every summer either on "rebelling" people or on new lands (soon to rebel).
Of course other peoples came to "rob" Rome of "its" gold (meaning, that was previously robbed from others), yet they never meant to enslave and destroy - at the opoosite of the lads in the picture.
The dacian column in Trajan's forum, in Rome, seems to be of assyrian tradition in the way it depicts the assimilation of a new people: mass-killing, mass raping, pillaging, war at its best between the civilized and the savages. It's propaganda, like the soviet and nazi one. Assurbanipal did the same before, and today is done the same on our medias ("the civilized" vs "the barbaric" - usually those who refuse the way of life of the first, especially the "democracy"). What's strange is most of the histoirians from my country still pay tribute and bend the knee to this testimony of mass destruction, calling it "the birth of a new people". I wonder what would roman soldiers have to say if confronted to this noble idea.
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner May 6, 2015
Yes, well this is all a matter of opinion and conjecture. It is obvious here that I being part Italian favor Roman history, and you being Romanian favor Dacian history, etc. However, if faced with the destruction of your own country would you not wage a total war to defend it? Isn't that both what Dacia and Rome did for their own interests? In the times of the Roman Republic the Romans very much favored a policy of only taking action when it was necessary, as in the case of the Illyrian pirates and when Carthage and Macedon posed a threat. However, there come points in time where you're neighbors will no longer just let you sit idly by as they see you as either a growing threat or someone ripe for the picking and wonder why you are not defending yourself. It's interesting that I'm reading Tacitus at the moment for a Junior Senior Seminar class at the university I'm attending. Now I don't know too much about how the Dacian peoples conducted their affairs, but I'll provide some insight on what Tacitus says about the Germans' customs (again I understand this is from a "Roman's" perspective):

"Many noble youths, if the land of their birth is stagnating in a long period of peace and inactivity, deliberately seek out other tribes which have some war in hand. For the Germans have no taste for peace; renown is more easily won among perils, and a large body of retainers cannot be kept together except by means of violence and war. They are always making demands on the generosity of their chief, asking for a coveted war-horse or a spear stained with the blood of a defeated enemy. Their meals, for which plentiful if homely fare is provided, count in lieu of pay. The wherewithal for this openhandedness comes from war and plunder. A German is not so easily prevailed upon to plough the land and wait patiently for harvest as to challenge a foe and earn wounds for his reward. He thinks it tame and spiritless to accumulate slowly by the sweat of his brow what can be got quickly by the loss of a little blood. When not engaged in warfare they spend a certain amount of time in hunting, but much more in idleness, thinking of nothing else but sleeping and eating. For the boldest and most warlike men have no regular employment, the care of house, home, and fields being left to the women, old men, and weaklings of the family. In thus dawdling away their time they show a strange inconsistency—at one and the same time loving indolence and hating peace."
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:iconalanusrex:
AlanusRex Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Professional General Artist
Rome was destroyed by itself as far as I know. The worse period of roman history, when it faced destruction, wasn't Hannibal or Pyrrus, or even Spartacus: it was the civil war against what it could produce best - cupid men like Sylla and Marius, Cesar and Pompey. I've heard about Tacitus, but Tacitus tells tales (litterary) - he never went to Germany, let alone spoke to any german. Herodotus spoke a lot about thracians and getae, yet he never bothered to meet them. I'm not for dacian historiography over roman historiography  (though this last point of view survived the fisrt, even if Trajan is supposed to have written a history of the dacians, same style as De Bello Gallico, but it disappeared over the ages) - think about it, there's no dacian historian, no dacian text, no dacian remains other than a few ruins and pottery and gold items... It looks like the birth of a new people didn't left much of the old - except Rome, of course. And that arrow hit in the forest shows the affairs of ones differ from the affairs of others. And yet it is said the dacians conquered Rome at the end, even if destroyed: because of the column, still living today; because of a dacian emperor (Galerius, and maybe Constantine the Great as well). But these are the same kind of stories as those of Tacitus. At the end, it doesn't matter who conquered who, but who will conquer soon.
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner May 6, 2015
"The worse period of roman history, when it faced destruction, wasn't Hannibal or Pyrrus, or even Spartacus: it was the civil war against what it could produce best - cupid men like Sylla and Marius, Cesar and Pompey."

Such is the case with politics, the active competition between two or more individuals. In any case, I think Rome did us all a favor in the sense that they showed us the importance of balance in government as taught by Aristotle and other Greek philosophers (Cicero as well). That is, the importance of balance between Monarchy, Aristocracy, and Democracy. The civil wars and active tensions you refer to exemplify this.

I'd like to point out that you're reasoning in your paragraph is filled with appeals to emotion (a logical fallacy) when you state "think about it, there's no dacian historian, no dacian text, no dacian remains other than a few ruins and pottery and gold items... It looks like the birth of a new people didn't left much of the old - except Rome, of course..."

As for this statement "And yet it is said the dacians conquered Rome at the end, even if destroyed: because of the column, still living today; because of a dacian emperor (Galerius, and maybe Constantine the Great as well). But these are the same kind of stories as those of Tacitus..." my response is I don't see how that is seen as proof of conquest at the hands of the Dacians.
 
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:iconalanusrex:
AlanusRex Featured By Owner May 6, 2015  Professional General Artist
This was my thought, when I've put commas.
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:iconmiko835:
Miko835 Featured By Owner Sep 24, 2014  Student Writer
"check his pulse if his still alive!"

"Why don't you do that I'm looking out for enemies!"

"....I'm dead....already....*gasps*"

"Vegetius no!"
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:iconrussellchap:
russellchap Featured By Owner Aug 13, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
The situation looks grim...
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:icontyrrhen:
Tyrrhen Featured By Owner Jul 24, 2014
cool
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:iconsaddlerager64:
SaddleRager64 Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Is the one with the Scutum from the 20th Legion Victrix?
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner Jul 21, 2014
I honestly have no idea.
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:iconkoturph:
KoturPH Featured By Owner Apr 4, 2014
<font><font>MUY BUENA!</font></font>
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Jun 15, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
who is the artist? :)
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2013  Student Traditional Artist
Nikolai Zubkhov.
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:icongabbanoche:
Gabbanoche Featured By Owner Jun 29, 2013  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thanks mate!
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:iconmergrath:
Mergrath Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
neet
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:iconevigvinter:
Evigvinter Featured By Owner Nov 12, 2011
foarte tare
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