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Battle of Nisibus 217 AD by Fall3NAiRBoRnE Battle of Nisibus 217 AD by Fall3NAiRBoRnE
Battle of Nisibus 217 AD
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:iconakkahn:
akkahn Featured By Owner May 31, 2015
The romans equipment is anachronistic. Most, if not all, of that equipment wouldnt be adopted until the 240sAD at the earliest.

Auxiliary type round shields werent adopted for legionaries until Aurelian and Diocletian in the 270's-280'sAD.

Bronze wouldnt have been used, especially not on the scale in this picture, as iron was cheaper and easier to produce and work. Bronze requires the combination of two metals and is notoriously hard to work with. Iron is a lot simpler.

The Legionaries would have still been using almost exclusively the Gladius at this point in time (217AD). It, again, wasnt until the mid 200's (around the adoption of the Spiculum (if in fact it wasnt just an already in use variation of the Pilum)) that the Spatha completely replaced the Gladius.

And the spear didnt become one of the legionaries main weapons until much later than even Diocletian

It is, however, a very nice and detailed picture. It could easily show any battle in the mid 200's, but not a battle in 217AD.
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner Edited May 31, 2015  Student Traditional Artist
There are some points in your text I find interresting like those about Bronze vs Iron helmets but also some with whom I can only strongly disagreed like:

-"Auxiliary type round shields werent adopted for legionaries until Aurelian and Diocletian in the 270's-280'sAD"

...in fact legionary infantry started to favor oval shields since ca.half of the 2nd century and by late 2nd early 3rd century they were already dominant type.This is very,very,very well documented in Roman art.Including on gravestones of soldiers who participated in this war and might easily be killed in this very battle.

I would also not call it "Auxiliary" type round shields because even auxiliaries very likely used "legionary"rectangular shields and plate armour as archeology and partialy also art suggest.With this I mean shield shapes were probably not so rigidly "reserved"to auxiliaries or legionaries only.This is truth at least from some point during 2nd century.

-"The Legionaries would have still been using almost exclusively the Gladius at this point in time (217AD). It, again, wasnt until the mid 200's..."

...Firstly it should be said that "Gladius"is just a general Latin word for swords-that means any sword regardless its shape or lenght.It does not reffer specifficaly to so-called short swords regardless how strong and popular this myth is.Word "Gladius"was not something like typological name for speciffic kind of swords(like for example "Spatha"is)and in fact from this very reason Roman authors normaly reffered even long swords as Gladii-because they says sword not "short sword".

Tendency towards longer and longer Hispanic swords is documented by archeology.Already during Marcommanic wars,if not sooner,many soldiers adopted special "short"sword type almost certainly from the Sarmatians and this type already had longer blade than previous models so it rather seems lenght of the shape was getting pretty gradualy longer and changes like this were usually not happening from decade to decade as you seems to imagine it but rather during longer time process and this process was not going everywhere in the empire uniformly at the same time.While Danubian regiments probably introduced lot of new style gear(as some scholars who attribute it to them suggests )around final decades of the 2nd century at some other parts of the Empire older models were still in us until new trends spreaded also there.


-"And the spear didnt become one of the legionaries main weapons until much later than even Diocletian"

...How can you be so sure about it?Lot of informations about these transitions towards new style soldiers are missing from 3rd to 4th century.From all I ever read I dare to say this particular topic is actually still very much clouded.However a lot of Roman 3rd century spear spikes were discovered along Roman northern frontiers and this probably suggest something different than how you put it.Also old Pilum javelin was still in use however(many Pilum types actually existed not just one).Last archeologicaly known exemplars dates shortly before Diocletian and the last possible depictions in art are in the hands of Praetorian guardsmen at early 4th century Constantinian art.
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:iconorphydian:
Orphydian Featured By Owner Feb 13, 2015  Hobbyist General Artist
do you have a bigger resolution of this?
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner Mar 1, 2015
The artist is Igor Dzis. You can find it in his blog here: igor-dzisblogspotcom.blogspot.…
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:iconamazingcatherine123:
AmazingCatherine123 Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2015  Student Writer
wow so much detail and so many colors OwO this is unimaginable. You don't see a ton of good art like this anymore uwu (no offense to anyone...seriously, no offense)
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2015
The artist is Igor Dzis. You should see his blog, he has entries on the side of the page from the past couple of years: igor-dzisblogspotcom.blogspot.…
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:iconroger-raven:
Roger-Raven Featured By Owner Jan 16, 2014
A great battle barely remembered! Persians/Parthians are injustly remembered as bad soldiers... Nisibus was a demonstration against that perjudice.
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:icondaniel-gleebits:
Daniel-Gleebits Featured By Owner Apr 25, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
The Persians were generally remembered as being a number game when it came to warfar, yes, but the Parthians gouged a place in history as a constant threat to Roman power in the east via their iconic horsemen. They beat Crassus and remained a threat to Rome and their client states in the are until the Sassanid empire overthrew them

:flaguk::salute:
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:iconamelianvs:
AMELIANVS Featured By Owner May 12, 2014  Student Traditional Artist
I would not put it as Sassanid empire overthrew them-This sounds like if invasion of some different state done it but it was the very same state which only changed its ruling Dynasty.
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:icondaniel-gleebits:
Daniel-Gleebits Featured By Owner May 12, 2014  Hobbyist Writer
I think we simply have a different idea of the definition of "overthrew". To me, a foreign power subjugating a sovereign state and one family taking the position of another is only different in scale.

:flaguk::salute:
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:iconjohan77:
johan77 Featured By Owner Nov 25, 2013
Excellent! Is this your artwork?
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner Nov 26, 2013
The artist is actually Igor Dzis. He updates his blog every now and then with new works. Lots more Roman paintings where that came from.
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:iconalexvanarsdale:
AlexVanArsdale Featured By Owner Sep 9, 2013  Professional General Artist
Looks like one of those cool book illustrations! Great Job! :D
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:iconbruc3w4yn3:
Bruc3W4yn3 Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2011
Very meticulous. All the detail gives the image a very real sense of carnage with minimal gore. The anatomical structure is superb and your colors are gorgeous. Did you research the uniforms? I'm finding a definite focal point on the fallen horse in the front, is that deliberate? Or should you work on drawing the eye around the image?
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:iconolavsson:
Olavsson Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2011
You made it?
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2011
Nah man, I wish. I'm basically using all these Roman images for reference, for a PC mod.
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:iconolavsson:
Olavsson Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2011
Don't happen to be a mod for total war series?
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:iconfall3nairborne:
Fall3NAiRBoRnE Featured By Owner Feb 1, 2011
I love the Total War series but its for Rise of Nations actually. Here's a link:[link]
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:iconolavsson:
Olavsson Featured By Owner Feb 4, 2011
Cool, used to play it with my friend. But I sort of forgot it after I got into AOE- and Total War series.
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:iconolavsson:
Olavsson Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2011
Ah, but interesting pictures and painting anyway. Love the roman age, and the history of that age. Be sure to post more.
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